Some celebrated cars are born of vision; others are created by necessity. Of these, the 1949 Ford belongs in that second class. 1949 FordAs a major component of “The Arsenal of Democracy,” Ford Motor Company was a gigantic contributor to the war effort, building not just trucks and Jeep and other vehicles but also airplane components.  However, like some veterans, Ford survived and thrived in the war only to have its very existence threatened by the peace.

Innovation is good, even better

When World War II came to a close in 1945, four years of war had created four years of pent-up consumer  need for automobiles, so the immediate post-war market swallowed up just about any new vehicle that could be manufactured. But Henry Ford II, who sat atop the Ford Motor Company, was savvy enough to recognize that when the initial boom died down, the consumer would seek out modern comfort and convenience, and that was something Ford Motor Company, in the immediate post-war days, was simply not ready to provide. Read more . . .

Sometimes even the perfect  ideas need a second chance, and so it was with the Chevrolet El Camino1959 Chevrolet El CaminoThe concept of a extremely styled, civilized pickup truck was definitely not new when the El Camino was introduced to the public in the 1959 model year, and it turned out that the ’59 Camino was more an artistic triumph than a commercial triumph, but that does not diminish the importance of the vehicle. After getting its second chance, it produced a line that would extend for 25 years.

Passenger Cars versus Trucks

Panel  trucks and pickups based on car platforms were relatively ordinary in the 1920s and 1930s. Since practically every vehicle on the road in those days used separate body-on-frame construction, it was a fairly uncomplicated task to build truck-like bodies and place them on car chassis.  Hudson,  Willys, and Studebaker were among the American manufacturers who offered car-based pickup trucks direct from the factory during those years, and panel truck and pickup  conversions of passenger cars done by aftermarket body-builders were far and wide available as well. Read more . . .

Speaking about hardship, they say whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. In the late Sixties, Ferruccio Lamborghini was enduring a string of hardship, despite the fact that his Miura was the darling of the automotive press. Lamborghini CountachThough once honored by Italy’s president as a “Knight of Labor,” a  label that brought with slightly more esteem than being named a “Kentucky Colonel,” his manufacturing plants were plagued by ruinous and long strikes. Communist agitation was everywhere, and the streets were often blotted by the chianti red of rioters’ blood.

Infancy concerns

Closer to home, the Lamborghini Miura seemed a victim of its own victory, like a precocious child that can’t quite adjust to adulthood. Read more . . .

White and gray Ford for sale

flickr.com/nimbupani

For the private owner to market a car for sale while avoiding the dangers associated with selling it privately is no small undertaking.  The following points should be taken into consideration :

Secret #1: Evaluate Your Personal Circumstances

The kind of person you are and the situations you are in,  play a major role in the decision to sell your own car. Before setting out to sell your car yourself, ensure that you have confidence in discussing with prospective buyers. Test-drives and phone calls are part of the procedures,  so it is important to be prepared to handle these as well. Simply knowing yourself and what you’re going to face is absolutely crucial. Read more . . .

Corvette - yellow body, black top

flickr.com/savannahgrandfather

People lease cars for various reasons.  Some drivers are capable of writing off their transportation costs at tax time.  There are those who lease to provide themselves with a regular supply of new cars.  Others still simply favour leasing to the hassles of car ownership.

Whatever your rationale for leasing a car, you need to know how to spot a good deal,  and save money on your lease. Read more . . .