The common conception is that Ford introduced the Mustang in 1964 to incredible success, and the folks at arch-rival Chevrolet simply copied the concept to make public  the Chevrolet  Camaro in  1966 for the 1967 model year.  Though, Chevrolet Camaro fact is, the rumour is not quite as simple as that. Despite commonly held notions, if one takes an indirect look at history, one might stress that Chevrolet, not Ford, actually introduced the small, personal sport coupe or “ponycar” and that Ford was the company that was playing catch-up when it introduced the Mustang.

Ford took a page from Studebaker and the American Motors  and designed what was essentially a scaled-down American car, which it named the Falcon. GM’s method was more “reach-out.”  Taking a page from the VW book, it entered the Read more . . .

From 1932 to 1954 the fate of Ford Motor Company would ride a wild roller coaster of ups and downs. Ford V8At times, sales forged ahead rapidly, and at others the company narrowly scaped going under.  However, throughout this 22-year period,  there was one constant, one everlasting icon that Ford enthusiasts could count on – the flathead Ford V8.

When it became abundantly obvious even to Henry Ford that his Model T was on its last legs in the marketplace, along about 1927 or so, the old man wanted to assemble a V-8-powered car to take its place. With the company’s future hanging by a thread, though, an interim move created another four cylinder car, the Model A. Read more . . .

Mercury has always existed in a Never-Never Land  inside Ford Motor Company. The brand was established in 1939 to fill the huge gap that existed between the luxury Lincoln and the popular-priced Ford, but for some reason, in the 60-plus years, the product has been in existence, Ford execs have been unable to give it a strong identity. 1964 Mercury MarauderCertainly, the mid-priced brands from General Motors —  Oldsmobile, Pontiac, and Buick — and Chrysler’s Dodge division have always had better-defined personas than Mercury, and that has always been to Mercury’s disadvantage. It seems that over the course of its history, Mercury has wavered from being just a tarted-up Ford to a near-Lincoln, which has made it improbable for the buying public to pin down. Of course, in the clutter of the American car market, if a brand has a puzzled image, it really has no image at all. Read more . . .

Sooner or later, many drivers find themselves in the fortunate situation of getting a new car.  Choosing the make and model is an thrilling process.  Then, the dilemma of whether to lease or buy comes into play.  Is it better to pay cash up front or arrange personal financing to own the vehicle outright, or should you choose lower monthly payments and give up ownership?

As is the case with most ordinary dilemmas, there are no black and white answers.  Each option has its own drawbacks and benefits, and your final decision depends on your particular personal and financial circumstances. Read more . . .

It is fitting that the quintessential military vehicle of today, the HMMWV (or Humvee), and the quintessential military vehicle of all eras, the Jeep, should arise from the same origin. Hummer H1Further, those roots are planted intensely in the soil of solidly Midwest Indiana, where they can be traced back to 1903, when Standard Wheel Company, a Terre Haute bicycle manufacturer, decided to enter the infant automobile industry with the introduction of the Overland Runabout, its first motor vehicle.

Competing for military respect

While Overland is a well-known name to antique auto buffs, a household name became associated with the enterprise when John North Willys purchased it in 1908, the same year the Chicago Cubs Read more . . .